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Investors highlighted the need for local partnerships to go deeper into unexplored geographies
A survey of 33 global investors is a ‘canary in the mine shaft’ for investor confidence in the Australian infrastructure market.
The fatal collapse indicates a public-private failure. But confronting the formidable challenges of maintaining ageing infrastructure will require more – not less – public-private cooperation.
But they will be watching whether the government delivers on its promise of support to Kansai International Airport’s concessionaire following the damage super-typhoon Jebi caused earlier this month.
While the region continues to experience some volatility and uncertainty – elections, slower-than-expected economic recovery and the lingering after-effects of corruption – infrastructure investors tell Kalliope Gourntis all the reasons that keep them coming back.
Now the initiative has ended, with most of the available assets in private hands, Daniel Kemp looks at the risks of taking such large businesses private.
Maintaining a good track record, resisting style drift and choosing the right partners are usually the boxes ticked to mitigate reputational risk. But with the rise of the #MeToo movement, industry stakeholders need to expand their horizons.
Populist sentiment may be putting pressure on politicians to tighten regulation, but improving communication between the public and private sectors – and changing the tone on both sides – is key to managing political risk.
Vincent Levita, founder and CEO of InfraVia Capital Partners, argues investors need to keep their discipline in 2018, but they also need to identify new geographies and sectors to invest in.
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